NYC: design at the Alt School

designWe are hardwired to appreciate beauty, and to recognize symmetry as such.  What is perhaps not innately hardwired is the fact that we sometimes devalue the importance of beauty in education. To clarify, design is incredibly important, and it hasn’t been until the last five years that I have recognized this.  Indeed, our current students are growing up in a visual world–with visual communication often being their primary mode of choice.  So why do some of us as educators take so little time designing our lessons with an eye toward how we present them?  The content is just one part of what we give to our students; in fact, by handing our students something that doesn’t look good, we lose some degree of credence.  If design is not intuitive for you, I can empathize, but what I have also learned is that there is a plethora of tools out there to help. Recognizing its importance is the first step, after which you begin to really observe what works well and what does not.
I recently visited the Alt School in New York City, a school launched by Google execs in San Francisco and recently expanded on the east coast. Among many othlogo_altschool_smaller things, it’s clear that the people at the Alt School understand the importance of quality design, and implement it with amazing fidelity.  I’d like to outline my time spent in a short tour of their facilities, and offer up how you might use their work as inspiration for your own classroom.
Despite the fact that I am somewhat challenged with directions, I found the tiny door that led upstairs to the tiny Alt school.  They take “micro-school” very seriously, both in that they serve the youngest students (pre-primary through third grade at present), and they also operate in a small space–a space they make welcoming, inspirational, and beautiful.  The first thing I noted is the color scheme–the ubiquitous gentle blue and white color combo that permeates the location.  To complement that, birch wood furniture filled just enough area to make plenty of room for movement as well as working space.  Creation tools enveloped the classrooms, complete with copious compartments for storage whose open design invited little hands to help themselves as needed.  While you 1447962509278-2may not have the luxury of ordering these ergonomically designed chairs, you likely have the flexibility to create room for movement and flow in your own classroom.  Without exception, each Alt School classroom had a space at the front of the room devoid of furniture, usually with a comfortable rug, and populated the remainder of space with chairs at small tables.  The rooms were small, but the design elements were apparent.  It’s true that the Brooklyn-based Alt School serves pre-primary through third grade at present, but the need for movement and a common space within any classroom is important.
What was perhaps most striking in the area of design at the Alt School was the work they are doing in personalizing learning through the use of tech tools.  Each student has a “playlist–” that is, a list of “cards” (or lessons) unnamed_copy-1424925296-1428754005-1428759519-2personalized to each student under a broad category of study. When teachers want to create lessons on any given topic, they have not only their own imagination to call on, but also the collective resources of all Alt School teachers.  They have, in essence, designed their own database that is organization-wide.  Teachers co-teach classes of about fifteen to twenty students, and work together to create cards to add to students’ playlists.  Using the Common Core as a guideline for skills, they work with students and the outside community to design a slightly varied experience for each student.  Teachers work with templates designed by Alt School’s own PED (Product, Engineering, and Design) team. Spoiled, right?  What an incredible opportunity it must be as a teacher to have someone readily available to beautify your ideas.
Right.  Public school teachers don’t have such extravagances.  (As an aside, the Alt School is on a long-term mission to change that.)  However, I see some of the same potential in the use of Schoology.  The interface is different, for certain, but it does offer many of the same tools.  Seeing what Alt School had to offer led me to ponder how underutilized Schoology is in my own classroom.  Connecting and collaborating with other educators is possible through this LMS.  How many of you are connecting regularly with others through Schoology?  I’d love to hear about it in the comments.  Additionally, creating a unit in your resources tab around certain learning goals is not so different than what’s happening at the Alt School.  Schoology offers the ability to push out a variety of formats/assignments to personalize experiences for students as well.  These are just a couple of the possibilities.
While I left the tour quite enamored with the beauty, incredible supports, and promise of the Alt School, I came away inspired to at least try to replicate some of what they are doing by doing a few relatively simple things:
* simplify my classroom: remove what isn’t necessary, and encourage creativity by arranging easy and constant access to materials
* cannonball (a.k.a. deep dive) into Schoology: connect with educators outside of my classroom walls, perhaps by using Twitter as a first resource
* make friends with a web designer–can’t hurt, right?
*Alt School photo credits to the Alt School

Published by

Lori Lisai

educator, arts enthusiast, runner, 2015 Rowland Fellow, and inspiration junkie cannonballing transformative classroom practice and life in general

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s