Teaching? Why Twitter is worth your time

Think about the last time you committed to changing something and it paid off–a time when you had to change habits, and although it was difficult, you did it because you believed in your end goal.  The struggle was hard, but it was worth it, right?  Now think about how much time you spend on social media–scrolling through recipes, fake news, and kids’ sports photos on Facebook or naming the filters on your Instagram feed.  How do these two connect?  Because committing to a new social media platform–namely Twitter–takes some commitment, but the end result is incredibly useful, and you’re much less likely to be subject to recipes or kids’ sports photos in your feed.  (I can’t say the same for fake news, but that’s another post altogether.)

I joined Twitter in 2009, and like most new Twitter users, was immediately flabbergasted.  My uncle told me I should check it out, and because I respected his tech savvy eye, I did.  My Twitteracy was elementary, to be sure.  I had no idea what a hashtag was, why there were so many @ symbols, or what on earth people were trying to say because everything was abbreviated.  I scrolled, wondering how this could ever be useful to anyone.  I spent some time lurking, following other Twitterers here and there, but feeling like I had really missed something.  Instead of feeling connected, I felt left out.  And stupid.  I left it unattended for a few years.  Yes, years.

And then one day, inspired by a desire to establish a better online presence and find other like-minded educators, I hopped back on and I found this: screen-shot-2017-02-18-at-5-48-41-pm

posted by @Stephen_H, and I thought, well, maybe it IS useful.  I was inspired, and that’s what it took to hook me.  I retweeted his graphic, because that’s an easy way to get your first tweet out there, and Twitter began to reveal its brilliance to me.

screen-shot-2017-02-19-at-2-54-27-pm
EdTech Nut’s guide to Twitter for beginners

Inspiration junkie by definition, Twitter is where I now go for my fix.  I didn’t realize it then, but in order for Twitter to work well for you, you have to work at it a bit.  After searching for and following people you already know, you have to dig around to find people who might inspire you, and reading through whatever pops up on your feed won’t necessarily help you in your first few weeks.  Instead, spend time searching for hashtags to find people who interest you.  You’ll know you’ve found someone worthwhile when you read their brief bio and it spurs you to read some of their tweets, which then inspire you.  When you find someone of interest, check out who they follow.  This can increase your network exponentially, where ten minutes of searching can suddenly fill your feed with the collective brilliance of a hundred more educators.

 

twitter-followers

You’ve heard of the six degrees of separation?  One of my favorite things about Twitter is that it becomes one degree so easily.  I’ve exchanged tweets with @MsMagiera, @gcouros, and @Sugatam –all people for whom I have great respect in the world of education.  I would never have directly communicated with them–and so easily–without Twitter.

With so many options to choose from in the world social media, it can be challenging to put in the time to learn another platform.  The way I think of Twitter, however, is as my professional social media platform.  The others have a bit of crossover, but I use Twitter to grow my PLN, garner inspiration from other educators, create connections for classroom games or lessons, and to learn.  It’s worth the time.  Do it.

My favorite hashtags:

 

Reference:

Fitzgerald, Kelly. “Using Twitter to Become a Strong Educator.” Using Twitter to Become a Strong Educator. N.p., 4 Sept. 2014. Web. 19 Feb. 2017.

 

Published by

Lori Lisai

educator, arts enthusiast, runner, 2015 Rowland Fellow, and inspiration junkie cannonballing transformative classroom practice and life in general

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