Relationships: 6 ways to encourage innovation through connections

As I’ve made the switch from a focus on students to a focus on teachers this year, I’ve been reminded that there are a lot of similarities between teaching students and teaching teachers.

First and foremost, it’s about relationships.

In The Innovator’s Mindset, George Couros referenced a New Yorker article that explained why “one-on-one interactions increase people’s willingness to try something new.”  In essence, the article explores the idea of seven “touches–” that is, interactions with people with whom you want to build a relationship.  Yes, this takes time, but if you are committed to change, you have to commit to connecting with the people who will make it happen.

While I admit I have an inclination toward risk in the classroom and in school, I recognize that this isn’t the case with everyone.  Still, I have an intense desire to help teachers try new things in the classroom, so I’ve been working diligently to develop relationships.  Below, I’ve included six things I regularly do to help build these connections.  I hope these may be of some use to you!

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Just two of the rockstar teachers with whom I’ve built relationships: Cori Rockwood & Katie Bryant

6 ways to innovation connections-3

 

References:

Couros, George. The Innovator’s Mindset: Empower Learning, Unleash Talent, and Lead a Culture of Creativity. San Diego, CA: Dave Burgess Consulting, 2015. Print.

Gawande, Atul. “Spreading Slow Ideas.” The New Yorker. The New Yorker, 19 June 2015. Web. 19 Mar. 2017.

 

 

 

Published by

Lori Lisai

educator, arts enthusiast, runner, 2015 Rowland Fellow, and inspiration junkie cannonballing transformative classroom practice and life in general

3 thoughts on “Relationships: 6 ways to encourage innovation through connections”

  1. Well, my crap detector could use an upgrade as well, so maybe a support group is in order…

    It is amazing what can happen when we step aside and let others lead with their bright spots, especially, in my case, classroom teachers. When they see that one of their own can successfully implement an idea or an approach, they are more likely to try it themselves. I quickly learned that as a non-classroom teacher, my encouragement and support and ideas were noted and appreciated and needed, but teachers really took note when they saw one of their fellow “in-the-trenchers” trying and integrating something new. And I don’t blame them! My job: keep encouraging, keep supporting, and then throw the PD party when someone is doing something great. And give that person all the credit. (Hopefully your principal knows the total scoop!)

    Liked by 1 person

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