What’s in a name? That which we call personalized learning…

doesn’t smell so sweet.  I battled a serious case of heartburn reading this recent NPR article by Anya Kamenetz parsing out the different definitions of “personalized learning.”   Take a look:

“In fact, in speaking about [personalized learning] with more than a dozen educators, technologists, innovation experts and researchers, I’ve developed a theory: “Personalized learning” has become a Janus-faced word, with at least two meanings in tension:

The use of software to allow each student to proceed through a pre-determined body of knowledge, most often math, at his or her own pace.

A whole new way of doing school, not necessarily focused on technology, where students set their own goals. They work both independently and together on projects that match their interests, while adults facilitate and invest in getting to know each student one-on-one, both their strengths and their challenges.

Which vision of personalization will prevail? Pace alone, or “Personalize it all”? And what proportion of the hype will be realized?”

Kamenetz, Anya, et al. “The Future Of Learning? Well, It’s Personal.” NPR, NPR, 16 Nov. 2018, http://www.npr.org/2018/11/16/657895964/the-future-of-learning-well-it-s-personal.

OH MY GAWD, LET IT BE NUMBER 2!!!

I spent last year engaged in a deep dive through an experience aptly named Learning Lab looking at this very question: what exactly is personalized learning?  With a group of incredibly talented educators, I grappled with an inquiry question around the importance of reflection in this new type of learning, attempting to refine my own definition. 

Lessons learned in stepping back: personalization in two student-centered classes (Business Start-ups & Exploring Education)

Still working on it.

Learning Lab 2.0 has launched with a new cohort looking at the same overarching theme, and diving into their own inquiries.  The range of questions is broad, but personalization in every context has a few things in common:

  • student voice and choice are paramount
  • students are partners
  • teachers act as guides, encouraging and inspiring, providing feedback and probing questions 

Part of my issue with Kamenetz’s article comes in this quote:

“At the beginning of a fad there’s a naming problem,”Rich Halverson says. He’s an education professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who has spent the last few years traveling around the country to see personalized learning in action at public schools.

Kamenetz, Anya, et al. “The Future Of Learning? Well, It’s Personal.” NPR, NPR, 16 Nov. 2018, http://www.npr.org/2018/11/16/657895964/the-future-of-learning-well-it-s-personal.

FAD??  

Come on!  Shifting practice so students drive the learning??  That’s a fad?  You understand the heartburn.  I hope.  If not, here’s my point about the danger: we have to get on the same page about what works for students.  The first definition offered (tech-driven pace-focused learning in front of a screen) can’t be seen as a solution.  Maybe it’s a part of a much larger whole, but when people make sweeping assumptions about a model like this as a solution to what ails public education, you get this.  Instead, let’s come to terms with the fact that students deserve a nuanced definition of personalized learning that always puts them at the center.  Zmuda, Curtis, and Ullman’s definition is one I prefer: 

Personalized learning is a progressively student-driven model in which students deeply engage in meaningful, authentic, and rigorous challenges to demonstrate desired outcomes.

Zmuda, A., Curtis, G., & Ullman, D. (2015). Learning personalized: The evolution of the contemporary classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

I love the idea of “progressively” student-driven, as it acknowledges that students do need some guidance; however, it suggests that students will eventually become capable of driving the ship themselves.  

If you haven’t seen Kallick and Zmuda’s Personalized Learning Sound Board yet, it’s a great metaphor for the mixing we must do as educators to find just the right balance for our students: 

Kallick, Bena, and Allison Zmuda. “Orchestrating the Move to Student-Driven Learning.” Educational Leadership, vol. 74, no. 6, Mar. 2017, pp. 53–57., doi:10.18411/a-2017-023.

Let’s acknowledge that we are professionals who understand that traditional teaching methods are not serving the needs of our students today.  However, the shift to update isn’t a simple answer but demands we consider the humans at the center of our profession.  The definition of personalized learning is as nuanced, multi-faceted and intricate as the students themselves, and that is as it should be.

Published by

Lori Lisai

educator, arts enthusiast, runner, 2015 Rowland Fellow, and inspiration junkie cannonballing transformative classroom practice and life in general

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