Reflection & Recapturing the Adventure in Learning (Part Two)

I’m not the most patient person on the planet, and like my URL suggests, I tend to cannonball.  My first few attempts were belly flops, but eventually I landed on an important realization…

Act Two:

Our Exploring Education class wrapped up quickly–too quickly, really.  School change takes root ever so slowly, and one semester was barely enough time to nudge our ideas into decision makers’ minds.  Following our students’ presentations to decision makers during which they shared their ideas, supporting research, and calls for change, we struggled to close with meaningful reflection and celebrate at the same time.  

The rushed experience highlighted for me the need for more flexible time in our schedules.

The ideal time to reflect on their presentations would have been immediately following them, and yet they rushed off to lunch and the rest of their day.  We attempted to unearth the residual excitement two days later at our next class, but the energy had left us and it felt disconnected despite our best attempts. Yet another example of the dissonance felt when a new model of learning is placed within traditional structures.  

Thankfully, our students continue to be passionate about their ideas.  They want to see change as badly as we do, and school change efforts move far too slowly for their young lives.  In motion are plans to completely remake one classroom with flexible seating, stand-up desks, LED lighting, and a fresh coat of paint, as well as grant applications to revamp all of our English rooms with new lighting.  In addition, two of our high school Science teachers–Amber Carbine-March and Kim Hoffman–were awarded a Rowland grant to introduce EPIC (Educational Path I Choose) Academy–a project-based learning model where students can opt into an immersive learning experience for nine-week rotations through the year.  In conjunction with this work, there is movement toward revamping our research lab space into one that supports independent, project-based learning–a perfect marriage between two of our groups’ visions.  

Jake & Ezra share their vision for a space to foster project-based learning.

With the realities of assessment pushing against the time we have with students, our push to balance time constraints with the need for meaningful reflection that sheds light on true learning remains a challenge.    

Act Three:

What I’ve realized this year in taking this deep dive into personalization is that

it is absolutely imperative to embrace self-reflection as the primary means of assessment in this new learning model.    

When I consider any meaningful learning experience I have had since leaving high school, the lessons came from deep reflection on experience.  If we seek to measure students’ understanding, that must be done through reflection, and clearly, we must be intentional in the teaching of it.  My sense is that it’s about asking questions repeatedly, looking at strong examples of reflection and dissecting them for meaning, and modeling. In short, good teaching.

In Learning: A Sense-maker’s Guide, Chris Watkins includes a chapter on “Helping Learners Make Sense of Their Learning,” in which he explains “four classroom practices that help learners:  notice learning, have conversations about learning, reflection, and finally making learning an object of learning” (28-29). Each builds upon the previous practice, and I noticed this exact pattern in our class.  Although I initially set out to help students reflect, I found that they were much more successful after we asked them specific questions about their learning.  Watkins purports that we should stop students when they are “in the flow” and ask them to notice how they are learning–another practice that would take plenty of un-learning, but would very likely result in deep metacognition.  I found myself coaching during our writing sessions, reading initial responses, discussing the why and probing for deeper thinking, and encouraging students to truly reflect. They didn’t like it so much–it’s not easy, it’s not a box to be filled in–but it’s worth it.

Production Team:

As Vermonters, we were given the gift of Act 77 to mandate change in our education system though our interpretation and implementation of that is left to local control.  I’ve seen numerous changes fail at our school because we lacked the systems and structures to support them regardless of how well-intentioned they were. In the Heath brothers’ genius book, Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard, the authors emphasize three important elements of making meaningful change stick: direct the rider (that is, build on your bright spots and make it clear where you’re headed), motivate the elephant (that is, make explicit the why of the change and then break it into small steps), and shape the path (that is, make it easy to switch and to build new habits).  Reworking the school schedule is the type of system change that has the potential to shift practice, and I’m looking forward to the changes our school has made with personalization in mind.  You make time for what you value, and schedules are a clear demonstration of that. Indeed, in this new school year, we have scheduled long blocks four days per week (all fixed days) with short blocks on Fridays.  I see great potential for Fridays as reflection day–a chance to think about what’s been accomplished over the week, what it means in the larger context, and how it might inform next steps.  

How might we encourage teachers to use this time to allow for student reflection?  I’m thinking there are two key elements: first, to model the importance of reflection with a deep dive into teachers’ own personalized learning plans (PLP’S) and second, to provide resources for encouraging, teaching, and assessing thoughtful reflection.  Katie Martin, author of Learner Centered Innovation: Spark Curiosity, Ignite Passion and Unleash Genius offers this thought:

“Teachers are professionals and should be treated as such, but part of being a professional is working to meet the goals and expectations of the larger system.  If we wouldn’t allow our students to opt out of learning or trying something new, why is it okay for educators? More importantly, as educators, we should be modeling and sharing our learning, not just telling others to do it.”

Martin, Katie. Learner Centered Innovation: Spark Curiosity, Ignite Passion and Unleash Genius. IMPress, 2018 (239).

If we are requiring our students to create personalized learning plans complete with reflection, and requiring teachers to establish yearly goals and reflect on them, why are we not requiring teachers to use the same process we create for our students?  What better way to empathize with our students’ plight? And what better way to understand how we must make time for reflection during our classes if it is to be meaningful? I envision students helping teachers set up online PLP’s, suddenly in the role of expert as they share their struggles with platforms, with the time they didn’t have to document their learning, with the lack of reflection.  Goosebumps, right? (Or is that terror at the thought of creating one of these plans? Interesting…)

Does the thought of creating your own PLP terrify you?

The second element to encouraging teachers to use Fridays for reflection is to provide the resources necessary to make it worthwhile.  Here, a list to start:

WHY?

  • AMLE’s Student Reflection: A Tool for Growth & Development (Originally designed to garner student feedback on her teaching, Brooke Eisenbach discovered deeper learning in the 10-15 minutes she allotted each Friday for student reflection: “An activity intended to suit my own instructional needs became an activity that inspired connection, openness, diversity, metacognition, and sense of community for my students.”)

HOW?

  • Reflection Prompts, Journal Ideas, and Creative Reflection Methods compiled by Mark J. Jackson for the Service and Learning Leadership Team at Trinity Lutheran College (Helps frame reflection in a “What? So What? Now What?” fashion–concrete, attainable, and effective.)
  • 40 Reflection Questions from Edutopia (Arranged into four categories: backward looking, forward looking, inward looking and outward looking, Edutopia provides  a slew of different questions to jumpstart reflective thinking.)
  • R is for REAL Reflection by Tarrant’s Life LeGeros (The REAL framework is reflective and built on student engagement.  Incredibly helpful links in this article as well as ideas for taking reflection off the page and allowing students to speak their truth–literally.)
  • 3 Ways to Use Flipgrid for Reflection by Tarrant’s Scott Thompson (There’s a reason the #Flipgridfever hashtag exists.  It’s a thing. Better, it’s a REFLECTIVE thing.  And, it’s fun.)
  • Ideas for creative reflection in the form of metaphor: Intention: Critical Creativity in the Classroom by Dan Ryder & Amy Burvall (book & website) (This book should sit on every teacher’s shelf, dog-eared, highlighted, and pulled off weekly for fun activities to engage students in deeper learning and reflection by tapping into their creativity and exercising their playful abstract minds through metaphorical thinking.)
  • Allison Zmuda’s Learning Personalized website (If you’re deep into personalized learning and haven’t yet heard of Allison Zmuda, get your head out of the sand and check out her work.  This post from 4th grader Ava Strauss will warm your heart and convince you of the power of student reflection.)  

Last, a couple of resources from our class, should you choose to embark on a similar crusade:

  • Exploring Education blog (my class’s blog–examples of reflective writing and thinking about our process.  Hopefully you’ll see some growth.)
  • Our Exploring Education course description (Feel free to use this as inspiration to create your own course that leverages the power of student voice to move change forward in your school)
Image: Simon Migaj (Unsplash)

Learning feels like an adventure when students can dive into their curiosities and explore with abandon.  When we help them along the way by constantly questioning the why, we encourage them to notice how they’re learning and in turn how they will succeed in future ventures.  It’s common knowledge that most students enter elementary school full of curiosity and wonder and leave high school with it tucked neatly away in a small, forgotten place.  

Let’s recapture the adventure with them and reflect on the glory of learning!

Published by

Lori Lisai

educator, arts enthusiast, runner, 2015 Rowland Fellow, and inspiration junkie cannonballing transformative classroom practice and life in general

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