Creativity: the cure to “you don’t know what you don’t know”

You don’t know what you don’t know.  And ignorance is not necessarily bliss.  How do we encourage our students (and even ourselves) to push past this block and discover what lies beyond?  

I visited NuVu yesterday for their Student Exhibition Night and was blown away by the young people whose excitement, passion, and willingness to talk about the design process was exquisite.  They spoke about projects they had developed–like a mechanism to help seniors stand up (as opposed to rocking back and forth in hopes of creating momentum to propel oneself out of a chair).  They shared stunning wearable art designed in collaboration with Heidi Latsky Dance–a company who celebrates diversity in its members–both disabled and not.  They created a Door Bot that opens doors for those bound to wheelchairs. 

In short, I was impressed.  The real bang came the next day, though, when I was able to chat with three girls involved in the designing of costumes for the dance company.  One student was from a public school and one from a private–two girls who had clearly developed a friendship through their work together.  We spoke about the transition to NuVu, and what challenges they faced.  Here’s what they told me:

“We just had to figure it out.”

“Coaches would lead us in a studio for a few hours and then they’d say, ‘Okay, now go do it.’ and we were like,’What?! I don’t know how to do that…”  And here’s the beauty:

the coaches didn’t tell them.

Crazy, right?!  How many times do your kids pester you for answers and  you finally give in and tell them just because it’s easier or you don’t want to listen to them whine anymore?  (Okay, maybe it’s just me.)

But that’s not happening at NuVu.  Students are figuring shit out.  And they’re designing prosthetic hands, interactive clothing that celebrates and brings attention to those lost to police brutality, interactive marketing tools…

Knowing my own tendency to “over help” and thereby cut off at the knees my own kids’ persistence, I pushed on this idea.  I wondered how they retrained their brains to adopt a new sort of thinking.  “What did you do when you were asked to brainstorm in a studio?”  The girls laughed, recalling their first studio where they would throw out an idea followed by an immediate discrediting–“oh, that will never work…”  They identified how short-sighted and self-limiting they had been, and how long it took them to develop the skill to think big, to dream the impossible in order to scale it to possible.

This is the beauty of design thinking, and why I think we need to embrace it regularly in our classrooms.  Being brave enough to dream the impossible, to share it with a group, and discuss how it might one day become something…that’s the magic of learning.  When we are so afraid to fail all the time, how might we redirect?  Might we start with our old habits of self-limiting narratives, and push past them to something else?

Authentic project-based learning (like what’s outlined in the Buck Institute’s HQPBL framework) is one way forward.  

If we want to graduate creative students who demonstrate skills, are truly lifelong learners, and persist as a matter of course, project-based learning is a clear path toward exactly that.  

If you’re not sure, take Sinek’s advice and step outside your box for a few minutes before you return to your classroom.